In the article by Branigin, he writes the following statement -

"American culture remains a powerful force – for better or worse – that influences people both here and around the world in countless ways. But several factors have combined in recent years to allow immigrants to resist, if they choose, the Americanization that had once been considered irresistible."

Based on the article, what are some of the factors that have contributed to immigrants resisting assimilation into American culture? Do you agree or disagree with the idea that immigrants should assimilate into their new American culture? 

You will make two entries for this blog activity. First, in a well-developed response, answer the above listed questions citing the article and your prior knowledge as support for your position. Second, choose one blogger's response and expand upon his/her thoughts regarding modern assimilation. Limit two elaborations per initial response; thus, if Jimmy already has had two people reply to his blog, a third person's blog to Jimmy's response will not be scored. Choose someone ELSE! (Sorry, Jimmy!) 

Be advised: grammar and punctuation are scored as strongly as your ideas, so it is recommended that you type your thoughts in a Word document before posting. 

All responses and elaborations are due by Monday at Midnight!

 


Hannah Leighton
11/09/2011 21:40

Based on the article, America’s Racial and Ethnic Divides, many factors contribute to the statement that immigrants resist assimilation into the American culture. I agree that most immigrants are hesitant in conforming into the American culture. Immigrants do not wish to let go of their heritage and culture to conform to the conflicting interests of American society. In the article it is stated that Americans put money over family, which is considered immoral to most Mexicans. As said in the article, “The family comes first, not money. It's important for our children not to be influenced too much by the gueros.’…‘I don't want my children to be influenced by immoral things.” (Page 2) Also, people naturally segregate into groups and immigrants have a habit of shutting out other cultures outside of their ethnic group (For example; Chinatown). Micro societies are created in America, separating the country as a whole. Immigrants have become a large percentage of our society; diversity has always been encouraged to unify the country. Nowadays, that motto has been thrown away and forgotten, if immigrants are unwilling to assimilate and accept the American way of life our entire culture is headed towards an abrupt change.

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Joe Perryman
11/11/2011 14:55

It is true that many factors are attributed to the hesitation of assimilation on the part of immigrants to American culture. As said in the article, one of the most prominent factors that lead to such resistance for Mexican immigrants is the increasing number of people in similar economic situations and in close proximity to each other, most all of whom are congregated in Spanish-speaking communities. The sheer numbers of fellow Mexican immigrants allow the mindset to take hold that because they are all together, the immigrants can entirely avoid assimilating to the capitalist American society they resent. When Professor Rueben Rambaut said “If assimilation is a learning process, it involves learning good things and bad things, it doesn’t always lead to something better,” he was correct in assuming that if Mexican families wanted to learn the ways of American culture, they would also have to understand why money appears to be valued more sometimes than even family. This concept is not acceptable to many, and that is why our country is becoming less of a melting pot and more of a “salad bowl.”

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Joe Perryman
11/11/2011 14:55

I agree with Hannah that traditional American culture will be greatly altered if immigrants chose to avoid assimilating into our society. The density of Mexican immigrants in southern states allows them to form a community that values only Mexican tradition and disregards all of the capitalist American morals that they so disapprove of. Such communities are not uncommon among immigrants however, taking into account the Chinese, German, and Italian immigrants (among others) in the past who have tended to stay together upon arrival in America. I do not think that the motto has been thrown away, only that it does not have the meaning it once had. It used to represent the United States as a place where people of all ethnic and financial backgrounds could come start a new life with each other as one; now it represents a place where all those people come to start their Americanized lives. Whatever culture they were used to becomes overshadowed by American influence and I believe that is why Hannah said the motto has been thrown away and forgotten.

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Hannah Leighton
11/11/2011 16:12

In regard to Joe’s response;
For clarification of my statement, “Micro societies are created in America, separating the country as a whole. Immigrants have become a large percentage of our society; diversity has always been encouraged to unify the country. Nowadays, that motto has been thrown away and forgotten.” It is not that I believe American influence has destroyed the motto; the inability of immigrants to adapt to the American way of living is the problem. This is a broad statement, which is not targeting only Mexican immigrants, but immigrants in general. As I have said before micro-societies have been created that shut out all ways of American living or any other cultural differences. People may live in America, but that does not necessarily mean they strive to be an American. Most immigrants come because they long to get away from their home country’s government system, war, or some sort of other conflict at hand. Not because they value the American way of living or want to be considered an American. This may not be true for all immigrants that move to this country, but it certainly is not a far stretch.

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Jared Neiman
11/13/2011 11:34

The article states that immigrants tend to equivocate American culture assimilation, this is true. In the article, the writer points out how accepting of diversity and ethnicity we are, permitting foreign citizens to resist assimilating. Also, what is acceptable in one culture, may not be in another, causing disconnection inside America. These are prime factors of why some immigrants tend to be single-cultured. The great "melting pot" is slowing becoming a "salad bowl"- despite the different ingredients, things just aren't mixing well.

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Jared Neiman
11/13/2011 11:39

*I didnt mean to click submit yet.*
Another viewpoint is shown in the article; "there is a sense that, especially as immigrant populations reach a critical mass in many communities, it is no longer the melting pot that is transforming them, but they who are transforming American society." In this sense, is American culture made of assimilating to one specific culture, or is it transforming into one multi-cultured based culture?

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Ryan Wisch
11/13/2011 15:12

One of the major reasons why immigrants are resisting assimilation into American society is the possibility that the social exceptions of America will corrupt their family. While this is a definite reason to fear assimilation, this does not give grounds to dismiss the idea of becoming an American. Another factor that affects assimilation is the enormous amount of immigrants that are present in some southern states. "Never before have so many immigrants come from a single country – Mexico – or from a single linguistic source-Spanish-speaking Latin America. Since 1970, more than half of the estimated 20 million foreign-born people who have settled in the United States, legally and illegally, have been Spanish speakers." Because of this immigrants have created their own subculture, this diminishes the need to assimilate. I believe that an immigrant should speak English and be able to function in American society while still respecting their old country tradition.

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Kenta Takao
11/13/2011 17:10

A major contributing factor for the refusal of assimilation is, from what I see, a fear of change. Maria Jacinto, a Mexican immigrant of 32, said, “I don’t want my children to be influenced by immoral things.” The immigrants fear that they will lose themselves and become someone corrupt or lacking in moral character. Maria earlier stated, “In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money.” These immigrants have a fear that their children will grow separate from what was originally their culture, their heritage, their history. They fear that they will grow apart. William Branigan writes, “The children of immigrants, especially those who were born in the United States or come here at a young age, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits.” It seems as if, like in The Hunger of Memory, the immigrants fear the loss of intimacy and connection in their family.
I agree that immigrants should assimilate into American society but they can keep the culture they choose. I don’t mind if someone chooses to be proud and show off their Chinese or Scottish heritage and the culture they represent. However, I believe that immigrants that come to American should integrate themselves into American society. In the article by William Branigan, he says, “[Immigrants] prefer such terms as “salad bowl” and the “mosaic”, metaphors that convey more of a sense of separateness.” Later on he writes, “In many places, new Hispanic immigrants have tended to cluster in "niche" occupations, live in segregated neighborhoods and worship in separate churches.”I don’t care whether a person chooses to live the life of an American or a Mexican or any other country for that matter but I do care for the separateness and divide they are trying to achieve in America. If immigrants start living in segregated neighborhoods and worship in separate churches, how is that any different from our days of segregation in the early 90’s? What did our integration and desegregation achieve if we are going to build walls and division in our country based on race and ethnicity? I believe in what Abraham Lincoln stated. He said,” A house divided against itself cannot stand,” but it seems immigrants might be creating that.

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Kenta Takao
11/13/2011 17:19

In response to Ryan, I agree that immigrants should learn to speak English and be able to function in American society. If I went to another country, such as Zimbabwe, I would learn their main language and not expect everyone to speak my language instead.I wouldn't get upset if they can't talk to me in my language.

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Stuart Pollock
11/13/2011 21:00

While many immigrants to America painstakingly assimilate themselves into our culture, others group together and maintain their old cultures and beliefs, leading to a radical change in our cultural “melting pot.” According to Branigin, this is influenced by factors including unprecedented populations of immigrants, geographic proximity to America, and the shared Hispanic culture. He explains, “[Hispanics’] heavy concentrations in certain parts of the country, their relatively close proximity to their native lands and their sheer numbers give this wave of immigrants an unprecedented potential to change the way the melting pot traditionally has worked.” Unlike previous immigrations, the Mexican population is a cohesive society that resists change.
Immigrants should not have to assimilate into American culture based on their entry into our country. Their diverse cultural beliefs form their identity and the mixing of separate identities is what makes America unique. Hispanic immigrants should be able to cling to their diversity and thus enrich our culture with their own.

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Chris Perkins
11/14/2011 15:56

Many facotrs have contributed to immigrants feeling the urge to assimilate themselves into an "american" or as close as they can to feel a sense of acceptance, but most refuse to conform. For example, when Jacinto says "I think I am still a mexican; when my skin turns white and my hair is blonde, then I will be an american," this being a bold statement to say the least, it is true in it's simplicity. Mexican immigrants like Jacinto, are rooted into their culture and feel like they don't need to change which is what makes Latinos a rooted race in American society. Imigrants from any part of the globe should never have to assimilate into being an American. The idea of the "Great melting pot" should incourage diversity becuase that is what builds this country. Instead of assimilating into American ideals and beliefs, immigrants should bring their own to make diversity and keep stiring our melting pot.

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Chris perkins
11/14/2011 16:04

I agree with stu, because not only is the melting pot idea I mentioned above a key ingrediant to our country; immigrants shouldn't feel oppressed to change because of their entry and as stu wrote "Enrich our culture with their own. The mexican race hasn't changed as we both agreeded upon they remain hard working and imbeded in their culture.

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Ryan Wisch
11/14/2011 16:17

In response to Stuart. I agree that immigrants should stay true to their cultural roots; yet they should be able to communicate in English and function in society as a whole. This my interpretation of how America has been shaped over the years.

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Stuart Pollock
11/14/2011 17:13

Joe: You’re correct in your assessment of the learning process associated with assimilation. The learning of both the “good things and bad things” of our culture relates to the good and bad of assimilation as a whole. Some cultures are less accepting and thus shape our culture instead of their own. I feel this is a benefit to our society, changing the way we view immigrants and view ourselves as a country.

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Jamie Boatman
11/14/2011 17:30

Based on the article, we can see that many factors have contributed to immigrants resisting assimilation into American culture. As stated in the article, “E Pluribus Unum (From Many, One) remains the national motto, but there no longer seems to be a consensus about what that should mean,” the meaning of what America stands for has grown to be less important. The once-known image of America, the “melting pot”, has transformed into a country not as accepting. Evident segregations have been formed in the past and are continuing to form, thus resulting in the resistance to assimilation. Immigrants feel as though they will not be accepted into the American society so the separate themselves into their own micro societies with similar ethnicities and cultures. In Mexican tradition, as stated in the article, “the family comes first, not money,” the apprehension focused on wealth is far less than that of the American tradition. When immigrants travel to America, the heart of their culture begins to shift away from tradition and reforms into the cultures of Americans. Another reason for the resistance to assimilation could be the fear of stereotypes. In Maria’s point of view, the average American has white skin and blonde hair; “When my skin turns white and my hair turns blonde, then I'll be an American.” When in America’s history, race, gender, hair color, ethnicity, etc. did not define your inhabitance. Personally, I think that as a country we must stick to our values and continue to be as accepting as we once were and help to make immigrants feel comfortable seeing that they make an effort to adapt.

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Cody J. Sykes
11/14/2011 17:39

A growing amount of immigrants are refusing to adapt our cultures, stating that American culture is simply too different from their own. As Maria Jacinto says, "In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money. It's important for our children not to be influenced too much by the gueros," Even things as minor as skin color can sometimes be alienating to immigrants, who use such terms as gueros -which means blondes- to refer to Americans in general.
When it comes to the point of whether or not immigrants should assimilate into American culture or not, I tend to be more in the middle. While I think that it's important for people to honor where they come from and keep traditions alive, I also believe that if someone decides to immigrate to the United States, they should at least put an effort forth to learn English so that they may function. In the sense of what Kenta said, if I move to Mexico, I don't expect people to speak English, so why should they expect us to speak Spanish?
Regardless, I do believe a balance between culture/tradition and assimilation can be found. Just look at Chinatowns! There, people of Chinese decent can go and enjoy their culture yet still function in the American culture. I think if we could have more places like Chinatowns, than we wouldn’t have to worry about assimilation, as people wouldn’t have to choose between their culture and American culture.

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Cody J. Sykes
11/14/2011 17:46

In response to Jamie, I agree that we've lost sight of what America stands for. With our alienation of new cultures, it's getting harder to blame them for splitting off into micro-cultures. As more micro-cultures appear, American culture will only grow even more alienating, causing a rather vicous cycle. Like you said Jamie, if we continue to be as accepting as we once were, than maybe immigrants will be more willing to adapt to American culture.

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Jamie Boatman
11/14/2011 18:05

**Correction to my post.. Jacinto is the one who states “When my skin turns white and my hair turns blonde, then I'll be an American.”

In response to Chris, I agree that immigrants from any part of the globe should never have to assimilate into being an American. When looking at this type of situation from an American point of view, if one were to migrate to another country they would not want to be expected to change their cultural traditions in order to become a citizen of that country. The joy in having mixed cultures is the diversity and morals that come with acceptance. As Chris said, to build our country we must encourage diversity.

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Cherylee Jouwsma
11/14/2011 18:55

In the article many factors contribute to the resistance of immigrants to assimilate to American culture. The article on the first page said, “In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first not money. It’s important for our children not be influenced too much.” Jacinto is displaying the values that her family growing up held and her fears of assimilation. Also in the article, ‘the children of immigrants, especially those who are born in the United States, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits.’ Parents are growing in a lifestyle and the children are adapting to a culture with different values. The fear is adamant however, immigrants are choosing to come to the U.S. and with that is the assimilating expectation. I believe that important milestones and traditions should be kept, but other parts should become an adaptive part of immigrants new society.

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Cherylee Jouwsma
11/14/2011 19:02

In response to Cody Sykes, i agree that there should be a cultural balance between assimilation and traditions. Also, that there is evidence in American society of that working. The choice is made to go to a different country and there is knowledge that your native tongue is not a dominate language, there for they should not expect everyone to be like them.

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Allison Olson
11/14/2011 19:16

To Cherylee’s response, I agree with her statement “immigrants are choosing to come the U.S. and with that is the assimilating expectation.” (Cherylee paragraph 1). Hispanics dismiss Americans’ “Habits” by implying they frown upon their children when they develop some habits from the “Queros” (blondies). If they object to American like behaviors they shouldn’t consider moving here. They make it sound like they only moved to America, because they heard it was a “Melting pot” and they would fit in fine. Without thinking that moving somewhere completely different and raising your children in a different community they were raised around will make a change in their lifestyle. "In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money. It's important for our children not to be influenced too much by the gueros," (Maria Jacito) in today’s society you have to consider money issue’s just to get by, our economy is poor and that proves that our ethnicity differs because be prioritize different.

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Dalton Carter
11/14/2011 20:38

Several factors influence and contribute to the increased numbers of immigrants resisting assimilation to United States culture. A significant factor which discourages assimilation is the distaste for what American Society does to each individual in an immigrant family. The article discusses an action called “segmented assimilation, in which immigrants follow different paths to incorporation in U.S. society”. Immigrant families may be hesitant to assimilate in fear of the separation it may cause in the togetherness of the family chemistry. Because each family member may conform to United States culture in their own way, the family dynamic, which existed when the family was enveloped in their respective culture, may not transition well into the new realm of American society. When assimilating into the United States culture, families frequently stray from the other members, “Sometimes, members of the same family end up taking sharply divergent paths…” To preserve family relationships, and the traditions of the family dynamic of immigrant culture, immigrant families may resist societal assimilation.

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Dalton Carter
11/14/2011 20:49

*To add on to my last post* I believe immigrants should make an attempt to assimilate into the United States culture with which they are benefiting from. This does not mean however, that I believe they should lose sight of their cultural heritage and traditions they bring from their previous country. In fact, I am supportive of the continuation of native traditions and cultural heritage. Instead, I am simply stating an attempt should be made by the immigrants to adapt themselves to the surrounding culture to ease the transition for not only themselves, but for the existing citizens of the United States.

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Katie Randall
11/14/2011 20:54

A major factor that contributes to immigrants resisting assimilation into American culture is the difference in values. Hispanics such as the Jacintos have strong family and religious values. These values have become decreasingly important among modern American societies. As religion and family loses its value to Americans, money takes its place. As it is said by Maria Jacinto in the article, “In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money. It’s important for our children not to be influenced too much by the gueros,” (page two) Hispanics do not want their children to hold American values above their own. I disagree with the idea that immigrants should assimilate into American culture. When one assimilates into another culture they give up what makes them unique; they lose themselves. Having said that, I also believe it is important not to shut out all other cultures completely.

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Brenna Mayfield
11/14/2011 20:55

The incoming immigrates are timid to lose their families heritage to a powerful country. Said by Jacinto “When my skin turns white and my hair turns blonde, then I’ll be an America”. She believe conveying into a “Barbie” figure would consider her an “American” and the representation of our nation is played in a cartoon which portrays a negative tone on Americans. Assimilation is now connected with a negative connotation as before becoming “Americanized” was desired everywhere. Immigrates now have the idea that you must become “white skinned and blonde hair” to be accepted in the land of the free. In America money is the top priority and society scarifies everything to be considered wealthy. Compared to other cultures Hispanics for example has the belief family comes before everything else. They don’t agree with the belief of money over family and in result they separate themselves from that thinking. I believe that they should accept certain qualities of American culture but also stay true to their roots. The new American has recently been known for being corrupt rather than the free and easy as it once was. In some situations I believe “Americanizing” items or family could be negative though with a proper amount you can accept our culture and continue practicing their own.
The short article relates to the “Hungry of Memory” and the characters in the novel. The article mentions that “born in the United States or come here at a young age, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits” which is what Richard did after several years. It adopted the America society when his parents struggle with the change. The language came to him with ease when his parents never discover the correct ability to speak well. In return for his acceptance of the new society he loses his family’s heritage.
I agree with Cherylee’s response, there needs to be a balance between the two. American has its negative and positive as does any other country. Though if you are willing to move your family from all they know then you must be willing to accept the society and the norms in our nation.

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Katie Randall
11/14/2011 20:55

I agree with Chris, immigrants should bring new ideals and beliefs to the table instead of throwing them away for American ideals. When people are open to different cultures they can accept others for who they are; this creates unity. Americans shouldn’t discourage diversity, we should embrace it. Without diversity this country would fall.

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Jared Neiman
11/14/2011 21:05

To further enhance Dalton's wonderful post, I agree that the major issue behind assimilation, from an immigrant's point of view, is the separation of family. Maria Jacinto cannot speak English but, her son can; so her son is more likely to adapt to American culture more so then his parents. Also, because he is so young, he will grow up in American society and learn to accept it, making his heritage obsolete. This would be a primary cause of why immigrants tend to not assimilate, because they are afraid of losing what means most to them, family.

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Dalton Carter
11/14/2011 21:08

Cody Sykes pointed out in his post, “Even things as minor as skin color can sometimes be alienating to immigrants…” This statement encompasses another reason for the refusal of assimilation in immigrants. American culture is constantly degrading the immigrant traffic in our country. From the comical racist jokes used widely in the media, to the degrading slang names used with prejudicial intent, America does little to accept the immigrants. The majority of immigrants come to United States for the quality of life they have the opportunity to lead, not to assimilate into the U.S. culture. Why would one agree with a culture which is constantly degrading their heritage?

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Dalton Carter
11/14/2011 21:11

*to be more politically correct, I should change "comical" to "intentionally" which would better support my point.

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Danielle Fitzgerald
11/14/2011 22:08

In this article there were many different factors for immigrants to resist cultural assimilation. A factor such as family. Maria Jacinto stated "In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money." Here she tells of a major reason for her not wanting to assimilate into American culture. She is afraid that "immoral" things such as money or wealth with influence her family in a negative way. But she has a reason to be hesitant according to Ruben G. Rumbaut, a sociolgy professor at Michigan State University. He was quoted stating that "it doesnt always lead to something better." I believe that they should accept certain cultural differences between our two opposing cultures, but they should also be willing to accept American culture a long side the're own.

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Danielle Fitzgerald
11/14/2011 22:17

I agree with Brenna that with a proper ammount of our culture being simutaneously practiced with they're culture assimilation is not so bad. It is a little give and take. You take two cultures and mix them together there might be some negativity but with the proper ammounts of both cultures things are put into a better order.

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Emily Parr
11/14/2011 22:18

I think a factor that often contributes to immigrants resisting in assimilation into the American culture is that parents do not want to see their child become distant from what they have taught them about their background and how they expect them to grow up. Branigin writes “The children of immigrants, especially those who were born in the United States or come here at a young age, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits.” Going back to what I wrote, he's stating that many young immigrants don't realize how they are influenced to change and become Americanized, which could possibly worry the parents. Also because America is quite often viewed as a negative society, “they see their children assimilating, but often to the worst aspects of American culture” such as possibly going so far as to harm themselves to create a more acceptable appearance in society (William Branigin). I believe that immigrants should try to assimilate to become successful and create that better life for their family that many come here to achieve, but it should not be forced upon them. I also think that there should be a balance between their culture and their new life living in the American society. It's important for them to not lose who they are and where they came from but it's equally important for them to be able to adjust to their new culture.

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Emily Parr
11/14/2011 22:27

I agree with Alli to a degree when she says, “if they object to American like behaviors they shouldn't consider moving here.” I think that immigrants should understand what they are possibly getting themselves into by moving their family to a completely different world from what they are used to. It's completely their decision to make that transition from one culture to another that has entirely different views such as putting money over family.

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Jordyn Vandenberg:)
11/14/2011 22:29

In the article Branigan writes, “When my skin turns white and my hair turns blonde, then I will be an American.” Immigrants have this idea of how “Americans” should look; but look around it’s not what they think. They are afraid to lose their sense of family heritage to what we call the “melting pot.” We expect other cultures different from ours to assimilate into the American society. Is that right of us? When they assimilate they are losing what makes them unique. In Hunger of Memory by Richard Rodriguez, he writes, “What I am about to say to you has taken me more than twenty years to admit: A primary reason for my success in the classroom was that I couldn’t forget that schooling was changing me and separating me from the life I enjoyed before becoming a student.”(Page 47) This quote represents the true emotions of a Hispanic that was at first, foreign to our society. When he was being forced to conform into an “American,” he lost his sense of comfort in his home and became a completely different person. He also points out that assimilating into the “American” society was the primary reason for his success. Because of his assimilation he was able to feel a sense of acceptance and more of an understanding of our society to truly succeed. In a way I agree with immigrants assimilating into the society because they are coming into our country that is probably vastly different from their own, we have different standards and norms, and I fell that they have a job in some sense to conform themselves. But, I also more strongly disagree. As I have stated before they are conforming themselves and losing their uniqueness which I feel Is not fair. Instead of trying to create “Americans” out of immigrants we should accept some cultures into our society instead of relying on conformity.

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Jordyn Vandenberg:)
11/14/2011 22:36

Cherylee, love your post. I agree with your point about immigrants entering the new American society. If they are immigrating into our society, we have certain expectations about assimilation and they should be willing to adapt. However i also feel that assimilation is draining immigrant’s individuality because we are trying to create this ideal image of Americans. We need to be open about cultures too, not just rely on conformity. That’s my opinion at least :)

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Jessica Stiffler
11/14/2011 23:18

Based on this article,America’s Racial and Ethnic Divides, immigrants have one main issue with assimilation; they do not want the family life and values of Americans. Maria Jacinto said, “It's important for our children not to be influenced too much by the gueros." These parents do not want their children to have the mind set of money before family, just as the “gueros” do. She states, “In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first, not money.” This was the main argument for these immigrants; they want their children to be more concerned about family, family first.
America has always been diverse and immigrants assimilating into a new America would be pulling apart the American way. However, America has also always been free, if the immigrants would like to assimilate a new America that would be their choice. Creating this would not be a good choice because it is teaching children about diversity and how to deal with it. Fencing yourself off from the rest of America because you want to keep your culture alive does not guarantee anything. To keep your culture in your home, you should teach your children about their heritage.

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Nate Parcel
11/14/2011 23:20

Assimilation can be described as a process in which a group or culture is converted into the more influential ethnicity. Within the article “America’s Racial and Ethnic Divides” the author writes how America has changed and how it affected the people from the influence of Hispanics over time as said by the author “it is this group, more than any other, that is redefining the melting pot.” I disagree that immigrants should assimilate into American culture because America is about the freedom to choose and live how you want not conforming to the majority. Although it would be better for the whole if they would learn how to better function in our culture. There can be numerous reasons why a Hispanic or any culture would not want to assimilate into a mass culture. Some could believe if they conform into a different culture they would lose a part of themselves or that it might be a too drastic of a change adapting. This can be proved when the author quotes “it’s difficult to adapt to the culture here” (pg. 2). Overall people no matter how well adapted into society will have tendencies to group with similar likenesses and we could never really become the giant “melting pot” metaphor used to describe America but should still have the option to keep their heredity intact and unchanged.

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Nate Parcel
11/14/2011 23:48

In response to Ryan Wisch, I do agree that immigrants should learn how to speak English but I believe that they shouldn’t have to. Of course I would prefer if they did because it would help our society function easier. When you say “… the social exceptions of America will corrupt their family.” I agree that there is a possibility that it may happen in some families but most likely it wouldn’t affect them. When immigrants create their own subculture you say “this diminishes the need to assimilate” I can’t entirely agree with that because there will always be moments that you will need to leave your subculture and venture into the main culture no matter how much you mind your own business proving that there is a high need to assimilate.

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Shoko Takao
11/14/2011 23:53

A couple major contributions to immigrants resisting assimilation would undoubtedly be in their sheer numbers and that they tend to settle where their culture is prominent. The articles mentions, “Today Hispanics, mostly of Mexican origin, make up 31 percent of the population of California and 28 percent of the population of Texas.” By having such large percentiles in few areas, immigrants are able to influence each other rather than have American culture influence them. In the long run, immigrants are able to retain their identity and help their culture thrive.
I agree with the concept that immigrants should assimilate into our American culture because in doing so, it fulfills their initial goals. Many immigrants move to America with the belief that they are creating a more promising future for their family. Maria Jacinto, an immigrant from Mexico, stated herself, “In the Hispanic tradition, the family comes first.” The issue with assimilation is that many immigrants refuse to forget their culture and history since that is what defines them in essence. By asking them to conform to American culture, we as a nation are asking them to give up their identity. While perhaps morally this is incorrect, I believe that creating strife within a family is worse. The last paragraph in the article states, “The children of immigrants, especially those who were born in the United States or come here at a young age, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits. Sometimes, members of the same family end up taking sharply divergent paths, especially children and their parents.” Surely when “family comes first” this would conflict with the parent’s sense of ethics and morals. Assimilation truly is a double-edged sword.

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Shoko Takao
11/14/2011 23:59

In response to Nate Parcel's belief that immigrants shouldn't be forced to assimilate to American culture, I agree with the idea that they shouldn't be "forced" however, I believe that by doing so it would benefit the immigrants themselves. The children of immigrants would have a more promising future if they did so which can be proven by David M. Kennedy's, a professor of American history at Stanford University, quote, "The children of immigrants, especially those who were born in the United States or come here at a young age, tend to learn English quickly and adopt American habits. Often they end up serving as translators for their parents."

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